Fiction is a Passport to Anywhere

Art shows us many worlds

In honour of finally finishing all the volumes of Proust’s In Search of Lost Time, I decided to share this quote from Time Regained, which captures one of the main reasons why I love reading.

Thanks to reading, I have lived many lives. I have seen a brave new world as Prospero’s daughter and seen the brave new world that John Savage saw when he hung himself. I have witnessed one hundred years of solitude and the fall of the House of Usher.

Like Tiresias, I have been man and woman. I have been madness maddened searching for a white whale. I have been a genteel woman in the English countryside, hoping for a suitable match for a husband. I, like Tiresias, have witnessed the empty romance of the typist and the young man carbuncular and the enduring romances of Dante and Beatrice, Petrarch and Laura, and so many others.

I have gone through the looking glass, through the wardrobe, and through the wall to Diagon Alley. I’ve been abducted by Tralfmadorians and been instructed not to panic (and to bring a towel).  I’ve awoken to found myself transformed into a monstrous vermin and (more than once) awoken to find it was all a dream.

What lives will you live today?

Advertisements

For those who like to criticize generations

 

Our Generation Waiting For Godot

People like to rag on this generation, the generation before us, even the generation to come. Ultimately, we are all human and have virtues and vices alike. There is good and terrible music made every decade and each generation is entitled in their own special way.

I’m a big fan of absurdist theatre. Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead is my favourite play. I’ve seen Beckett’s Waiting for Godot 3 times and have enjoyed it every time despite its bleakness. When I saw this quote while reading the stageplay I had to put it up on the blog. It’s a bit depressing, yes, but I don’t think it’s wrong.

Thackeray on Kindness

Never lose a chance of saying a kind word. As Collingwood never saw a vacant place in his estate but he took an acorn out of his pocket and popped it in; so deal with your compliments through life. An acorn costs nothing; but it may sprout

If you read Vanity Fair or The Luck of Barry Lyndon (or watched the amazing Kubrick adaptation), you discover pretty quickly that Thackeray is a cynic. His books are filled with some characters who are truly delightful, extremely awful, and always amazingly human. But I think at the end of the day Thackeray believes in humanity, or at least some human individuals, and delivers to us this piece of advice from Vanity Fair on the benefit of kindness.

As I mentioned in my previous blog post, you never know much or in what way you’re impacting the world. Being kind can make a much bigger difference than you might think. I’m incredibly shy and for a long time would rarely give out compliments (or you know, talk to people in general), but I found that being kind, even in little ways, changed the perceptions people have of you and make the world a little bit better of a place.

Remember: you don’t know what’s going on in someone’s life. Letting them know they look beautiful today or you thought they did a good job leading the last staff meeting can make a big difference. So go out and give a genuine compliment today! See what happens 🙂